The Big Eclipse

January 20th, 2017

Finally–I give you my first completed painting of 2017!

The Big Eclipse. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

The Big Eclipse. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

I love it. Its title is self-explanatory: “The Big Eclipse.”

Eclipse paintings in Cedar Lee studio. Top: A Dream of Joy and Sorrow, © 2016 Bottom: The Big Eclipse, © 2017

Eclipse paintings in Cedar Lee studio. Top: A Dream of Joy and Sorrow, © 2016 Bottom: The Big Eclipse, © 2017

Because of its large scale, the vibrant deep crimson layered with many colors, and the simple composition of the solar eclipse making a circle within the rectangle of the canvas, this painting has a powerful presence.

Painting on easel: The Big Eclipse. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

Painting on easel: The Big Eclipse. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

Of course when viewing a real solar eclipse, the moon appears as a flat, dark disk. But I’ve made the artistic decision to show the details of the moon’s rocky peaks and craters.

Detail: The Big Eclipse. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

Detail: The Big Eclipse. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

From afar, the image clearly reads as the much-loved, recognizable surface of our moon. But up close, you can see how loose I was with the paintbrush.

Detail: The Big Eclipse. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

Detail: The Big Eclipse. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

I walked that line between realism and playing with the messy paint. I painted the moon with mostly white and Payne’s gray, with a bit of burnt umber mixed in here and there.

Detail: The Big Eclipse. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

Detail: The Big Eclipse. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

The rays of the sun’s corona radiate out in all directions. Though red is the dominant color, many colors show up in the sky surrounding the eclipse, including yellow, orange, green, gray and brown.

The Big Eclipse © 2017 on drying rack in Cedar Lee art studio

The Big Eclipse © 2017 on drying rack in Cedar Lee art studio

I achieved this dynamic effect by working with several layers of glazes, so that each color would shine through the successive layers of color.

Gallery-wrapped painted edge of The Big Eclipse. Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

Gallery-wrapped painted edge of The Big Eclipse. Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

The painting continues around the deep edges, contributing to the impact of the piece and making it look fantastic as is, without the need for a frame.

Detail showing artist's signature: The Big Eclipse. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

Detail showing artist’s signature: The Big Eclipse. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2017 Cedar Lee

Several more new Eclipse paintings are in various stages of drying and being photographed, so keep an eye out for more soon!

From the Art By Cedar Archives: Square Girl

January 16th, 2017

When I first began painting as a serious discipline, completing my first “series,” although I didn’t even call it that at the time, I was 18 years old.

The series, which I called “square paintings” was inspired by the pixelation of low-quality digital photographs, the art of Chuck Close, and the images of plant cells under a microscope from some college biology class.  I decided to do these portraits of people broken up into a grid, with variations of color in each cell of the grid.  I called them “square paintings.”

It ended up being just a phase in my artistic journey, but doing those paintings taught me some skills (color mixing, composition, patience) and some new ways of looking at things.

The first painting in this series was simply titled “Square Girl.”  I stole her face from a magazine ad for deodorant.

The only record I have of her is this terribly pixelated old photo, which I feel is somewhat appropriate.

Square Girl. 20" x 16", Acrylic on Canvas, © 1999 Cedar Lee

Square Girl. 20″ x 16″, Acrylic on Canvas, © 1999 Cedar Lee

I painted her in cheap student-grade acrylics on a cheap student canvas board, but somehow I achieved a luminescent effect, and I still think she is the best out of all the square paintings.  Some friends of my grandparents bought her for $200, which was a big deal for me at the time.

I can see in this painting how much I was struggling to teach myself color theory, how I was figuring out how the different pigments interacted through trial and error. I was still missing the subtlety of color choices that can only come from years of experience. There was no concept of limiting my palette intentionally. It was just white, black, red, yellow, blue.

Despite this, I think it is a stunning painting, and I will always feel affection for this piece.

Color is hard–something I still struggle with, but I just work out more advanced problems these days. I think the challenge of working with color is central to the practice of painting, especially anytime an artist steps outside of their tried-and-true formulas. Playing with color is also incredibly fun. The possibilities are infinite!

You can see some of the other paintings from this short-lived series paintings in this blog post from 2010, in which I also discuss my difficult decision to (gasp!) destroy one of them.

Back to 2017.

Cedar Lee working in art studio

Cedar Lee working in art studio

For those of you who feel the stirrings of a desire to own an original painting: This year I’ll be planning an art sale for the spring (think tax return time) and likely another in the fall (think “Black Friday” time.)

My current art situation: I have several new large-scale Lotus paintings I’ve done since my last sale, and quite a few of the Tree of Life paintings I did last year. I now only have 4-5 of my Looking Up paintings left, but I have plans to paint more eventually–especially some fall trees.

I’m currently working on new Eclipse paintings for the solo show I’m having in August/September…New pieces to be revealed very soon! When I reach a point in that series that I have enough work for that show, I will switch to working on other themes.

Some of my most loyal collectors have given me feedback this week, telling me they love the Lotus series and want to see more of those from me this year. Right now I only have the few large-scale Lotus paintings, so I have an image in mind of creating some small-medium sizes–maybe a few in a 12″ x 36″ panorama format, a size/format I’ve been loving lately.

Every time I consider dropping some of these disparate pursuits to narrow my focus, I realize that as appealing as the idea of narrowing my focus truly is, I’m just not ready to put any of them aside quite yet. It will be interesting to see where my art takes me next!

From the Art By Cedar Archives: Opposites Attract

January 9th, 2017

Back in December, I passed a huge personal milestone. I created my 500th painting!

Well…that is…my 500th painting to be cataloged in my files. I do not know how many works of art I created during my childhood and teen years. Even when I started to become more prolific around age 19-20–around the year 2000—until 2005, I was still in school and was not yet working as a professional artist except for the occasional sale of a painting. I did not yet have a system for photographing or cataloging my artwork. So, I only have a few photographs of my work during those early years.

I know who owns some of the paintings I’ve sold in recent years, but for most of my older work, I have no idea where all that art has ended up–having been sold out of my possession and perhaps re-homed since, so for many pieces, the photos are all I have to remember them by.

While looking through my photos of past artwork, I made the commitment to share some of these special images with you over the course of 2017.

Opposites Attract. 28" x 22”, Watercolor & Ink on Paper, © 1997 Cedar Lee

Opposites Attract. 28″ x 22”, Watercolor & Ink on Paper, © 1997 Cedar Lee

This piece is the very first one to make it into my inventory file. Titled “Opposites Attract,” it is painted in watercolors on paper, with the delineations around all the shapes drawn in ink. (Sharpie?) I was 16 years old. I believe I painted this for one of my high school art classes. Shout out to Mrs. Ensley!

You may not recognize this painting as mine if you didn’t know. At the time, I was just a teenager who loved art, still experimenting with materials and methods. I had no idea about what I would end up doing in the long-term, what themes or styles would sink their hooks into my imagination in my future years as an artist. This was an exercise in complementary colors, the use of shape and line.

I don’t remember where I copied these two faces from (most likely, an ad in a magazine) but wherever I found them, the image inspired me to immortalize them. I love that this piece shows an innocent reverence for romantic love through my child eyes. I captured a soft gentleness in the eyes of the woman and the man.

Detail: Opposites Attract. 28" x 22”, Watercolor & Ink on Paper, © 1997 Cedar Lee

Detail: Opposites Attract. 28″ x 22”, Watercolor & Ink on Paper, © 1997 Cedar Lee

I love how the two people mostly stick to their assigned “warm” and “cool” colors, but in certain spots, they take on some of the other–the lavender-gray with a bit of orange on her forehead, the subtle pops of pink that show up on his cheeks, that one lock of hair in the middle, and his shoulder on the right. Part of the arm she has draped over him on the right has been swallowed by red, and what appears to be his hand at the end of his sleeve is mysteriously blue.

I like to imagine when they end their embrace and move apart, that they each morph back into independent monochrome. Now, as an adult, I still love the symbolism found here.

 

New Year’s Art Projects

January 6th, 2017

I’m back to work after visiting with family for two weeks over the holidays. Happy New Year!

In the studio on this sunny but frigidly cold first week of January, I have my five most recent Eclipse paintings laid out on the drying rack, all awaiting their final coat of varnish.

Eclipse paintings in Cedar Lee art studio

Eclipse paintings in Cedar Lee art studio

In 2016, I created 53 paintings–not bad! This is an average of slightly more than one painting per week, especially considering there were 5 weeks out of last year when I did not work in the studio due to various travels. So, 53 is my goal to beat for 2017! There are never enough hours in the day. I’m sure I’m not alone in this feeling.

I’m already working on my first painting of the new year, but it’s a fairly large one (30″ x 40″) and therefore a bit time-consuming, so it probably won’t be finished until next week. I like to start out a new year with something ambitious before moving on to the many smaller things I want to do.

I don’t want to show the new work in progress in entirety, but here is a close-up of a little piece of it.

Cedar Lee close-up of work in progress

Also in the studio today, I’ve just finished painting this belly cast for a friend. She requested a Tree of Life as the main theme, with the cycles of the moon across the chest.

Belly cast painted by Cedar Lee

Here are the colors currently on my palette after working on both my large work-in-progress and the belly cast. I always like to look at messy paint palettes–sometimes they can stand on their own as inadvertently beautiful abstract paintings.

studio010620172

Eclipse Art: Awesome!

December 15th, 2016

This Eclipse painting is self-explanitorily titled “Awesome!”

Awesome! 24" x 30", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Awesome! 24″ x 30″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

The sun and moon during this moment of total solar eclipse are larger than life. I painted the details of the moon’s cratered surface with sharp contrast. Two young children leap into the air, bursting with excitement as they watch the vision playing out in the sky. An enormous hawk soars in the air above them.

Close-up detail: Awesome! 24" x 30", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Close-up detail: Awesome! 24″ x 30″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

I used the shapes of my own kids’ silhouettes, taken from still frames of a video of them jumping up and down in excitement. This painting is about that child-like feeling of overwhelming awe, that cannot be contained in their bodies and has to burst out with movement and noise. They are shouting what anyone would say when confronted with such a sight: “Awesome!”

Close-up detail: Awesome! 24" x 30", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Close-up detail: Awesome! 24″ x 30″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Imagine being that hawk, flying through the air with this sky as a backdrop!

This is obviously not what a real eclipse looks like–in real life, the moon appears as a black disk blocking out the sun, and the sky gets momentarily dark. I chose to paint the concept of an eclipse in such a way that you can see the surface of the moon, full of colors. I am in love with this moon and plan to play with painting the moon in different ways in my next paintings!

Close-up detail: Awesome! 24" x 30", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Close-up detail: Awesome! 24″ x 30″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

The moon’s craters are not accurately placed or to-scale in this painting–I sketched this freehand in thick paint let the paint do what it wanted, but even so, you can still get the gist of the recognizable shapes we have all seen so many times. You can clearly see the big crater at the bottom, “Tycho,” and the smaller crater, “Copernicus” towards the upper left.

Awesome! scale1

Art by Cedar Lee in studio. Top: A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30″ x 40″. Bottom: Awesome! 24″ x 30″.

Like my last painting, “A Dream of Joy and Sorrow,” I have stuck to a color palette of earth tones for this one. The dominant color in this new painting is burnt sienna. Both were painted using cold wax medium, with much of the paint applied with palette knives, for an intentionally rough texture.

Awesome! scale2

Art by Cedar Lee in studio. Top-bottom: Corona. 24″ x 30″, Eclipse Love. 24″ x 30, Awesome! 24″ x 30″.

Here in the studio, you can see the painting on the easel, with two of my other recent Eclipse paintings of the same size. The canvases leaning against the wall have been toned with Naples yellow in preparation for new paintings.

Awesome! 24" x 30", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Awesome! 24″ x 30″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

There are varied textures throughout this painting, created with knives, rollers, brushes, splatters and glazes. The painting continues all around the edges of the canvas.

Detail: Awesome! 24" x 30", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Detail: Awesome! 24″ x 30″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Awesome! 24" x 30", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Awesome! 24″ x 30″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Less than a week now until the Winter Solstice and the move back towards longer days. I’ll be spending the holidays with family. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year in advance!

Artist Interview

December 12th, 2016

Today I was sent some questions by a college student requesting an interview. Scroll down to read my answers.

Earlier this week, I also took some new head shots in the studio to use on my website and social media accounts. The paintings in the background are “Oxygen,” and “A Dream of Joy and Sorrow.”

Artist Cedar Lee

Artist Cedar Lee

Artist Cedar Lee

Artist Cedar Lee

Artist Cedar Lee

Artist Cedar Lee

Right now in the studio: I’m hoping to finish one last large Eclipse painting before the year ends. I’m working again with silhouetted people in this next one! Coming soon…

Interview with Cedar Lee:

Your artwork seems to have a common theme; how would you describe your art?

I currently have four different series of paintings I’m still adding to, and I skip around from one to another: “Looking Up”— tree canopies and giant sequoia forests, “Lotus”—stylized lotus flowers, “Eclipse”—exploring the moment of a total solar eclipse, and “Tree of Life”—different images of the Tree of Life, often showing the roots underground, and some including small human figures.

These themes are pretty varied but are all obviously nature-inspired, and they all include a bold use of color. My work is a combination of realistic imagery and things pulled from my imagination.

Who and what are your inspirations in your work and as a professional artist?

I take a lot of photographs and I’m always collecting mental images that find their way into my paintings. I’m heavily influenced by my travels and many different places I’ve lived—this is most evident in my paintings inspired directly by nature hikes through forests, but in my more whimsical images as well—there is often a spirit of wonder and adventure to be found in the image, and sometimes there is even a human adventurer pictured.

In the studio, I like the challenge of mastering the materials. My inspiration is often found in the act itself of creating artwork, as things I discover while experimenting or solving a problem will lead into the next piece.

How did college prepare you for your career as an artist?

I have a BA in studio art from Goucher College in Baltimore. They have an excellent art department. Beyond the obvious benefits of taking art classes—introduction to different art mediums and techniques, and art history, during my time there I learned how to think about and talk about art with my fellow art students. My senior year was most valuable to me as a painter, when I did a semester of independent study, which was my first experience creating a cohesive series of paintings for my senior thesis show. This was my first time seeing a long-term creative project through to the end. Persistence towards bigger goals than just whatever current art piece you’re working on is such an indispensable part of artistic success.

Notably lacking from my college curriculum was any focus on art business—something that I had to figure out afterwards on my own. I think that college art programs should all include courses on entrepreneurship, marketing, and small business strategy. Most don’t, and this is a great disservice to many students who are serious about pursuing careers as artists, but aren’t being given the tools they need.

What do you consider to be your most important accomplishment to this date?

I have just recently created my 500th painting! (Not including any artwork created in my childhood and teens before I started cataloging my artwork.) The work is always my biggest accomplishment. Selling artwork is exciting, exhibiting is exciting, but without the paintings themselves, none of that could happen.

Please note: arguably much more important than this, I am also raising two beautiful children.

What advice would you give to an aspiring artist today?

Never stop. To be a professional artist, you have to want it more than anything. You have to have a certain kind of stubborn personality that won’t ever let you quit, and you have to have just the right balance of ego and humbleness. You have to understand that you suck while also believing in your work enough to keep striving to be great. You have to commit to figuring out your blind spots and teaching yourself everything you need to learn.

Figure out early on how to create a professional image and how to present your work well to the public. A website is a must. Create a consistent body of work, photograph it well and keep your files organized. Use the best quality art materials you can afford. Value your own time and expertise, and refuse to work for free.

Read about art business, make strategic plans, and work your plans. Subscribe to Professional Artist magazine, the email newsletters from Alyson Stanfield aka “Art Biz Coach” and Jason Horejs’ “Reddotblog.” Read “The War of Art,” “Steal Like an Artist,” “Art and Fear,” and all the other books you can that help you gain perspective.

If you must work an unrelated job to keep your finances afloat, or you have family responsibilities that limit your time, that is okay. Just keep the thread of your art alive throughout the years, and you’ll be glad you are prepared when opportunities present. Take the long view. Being an artist is a lifetime endeavor.

Seek out and surround yourself with artists that inspire you. When in doubt, look at lots of great art to re-ignite your passion and commitment to your own work. Just as they say, “write the book you want to read,” it’s important to paint the painting you want to hang on your own wall. Create the thing that you need to exist in the world, and if all else fails, you’ll still have experienced one of the best parts of being human.

Eclipse Art: A Dream of Joy and Sorrow

November 29th, 2016

A woman stands alone in a bleak rocky landscape, gazing at the total solar eclipse that fills the expansive golden sky.

She feels simultaneously desolate and wonder-stuck by the awesome scene before her.

A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

I’ve always loved the poem “Desiderata” by Max Ehrmann, especially the line towards the end:

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world.

This is such a true description of the bittersweet nature of our experience. Within a very short window of time, and sometimes even all at once, we can feel the heavy weight of grief and pain and also the buoyancy of gratitude and wonderment. This is what I was thinking of as I created this image: “A Dream of Joy and Sorrow.”

A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

The joyful feeling comes from the rare treat of witnessing this solar eclipse–the light of the sun bursts from behind the dark disk of the moon, flooding the sky with red and gold light. At the periphery, where the sky is darker, countless twinkling stars are visible.

Detail: A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Detail: A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

The shadows of the moon’s rocky surface are an earthy charcoal, the highlights a muted gold.

Detail: A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Detail: A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

The sorrowful feeling is represented by the stark, barren landscape surrounding the woman, and by the inky black liquid dripping down the hills in the foreground like endless seeping tears. The earth is crying.

Detail: A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Detail: A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

You’ll notice that there is a teardrop trailing down below each of her feet, as if the sorrow is flowing down through her body, out her feet which are planted on the top of that little hill, and into the ground along with the other tears. Meanwhile, her body is still and her face is lifted in amazement towards the spectacle in the sky.

This painting is 30″ x 40″.

Artist with her work: A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee (Background: Oxygen. 30" x 40", Oil on Wood)

Artist with her work: A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee (Background: Oxygen. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Wood)

The painting continues around the edges.

A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30" x 40", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

A Dream of Joy and Sorrow. 30″ x 40″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

 

Eclipse Love

November 14th, 2016

Here is “Eclipse Love.”

You may recognize this silhouetted couple from my earlier painting, “We Made It.” I loved the composition of shapes created by the way they are standing, so I decided to use them again.

Eclipse Love. 24" x 30", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Eclipse Love. 24″ x 30″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

The magical moment they are witnessing is a solar eclipse in progress. The moon almost obscures the sun, with only a gleaming crescent of the sun visible from behind.

The moon is a luminous lavender.

Paintings in Cedar Lee art studio. "Eclipse Love" on easel. Background: "Forest Nymph" (top), "Quest for Light" (bottom.)

Paintings in Cedar Lee art studio. “Eclipse Love” on easel. Background: “Forest Nymph” (top), “Quest for Light” (bottom.)

This painting is 24″ x 30″. You can get an idea of the scale when you see it here on the easel.

Detail: Eclipse Love. 24" x 30", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Detail: Eclipse Love. 24″ x 30″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

A solar eclipse is an occurrence that, in real life, throws the world into darkness, but here, it is painted in brilliant colors. I’ve also made the sun and moon unnaturally large. Because of the “moon illusion,” when you see the moon down low near the horizon, it appears larger than a moon high in the sky. I’ve pushed this effect to the extreme for a dramatic visual experience.

Detail: Eclipse Love. 24" x 30", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Detail: Eclipse Love. 24″ x 30″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

The couple is outlined in a sliver of electric blue light.

Eclipse Love. 24" x 30", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Eclipse Love. 24″ x 30″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Depending on the weather where you are, you may be able to see a similarly gigantic full moon tonight, as the November 2016 Supermoon makes its appearance–the moon this week appears extraordinarily large and bright because not only is it a full moon, but it’s also at the point in the moon’s orbit at which the moon is closest to Earth!

Deep Roots and Milky Way

November 7th, 2016

Here is “Deep Roots and Milky Way,” the newest addition to my Tree of Life series.

Deep Roots and Milky Way. 16″ x 12″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Deep Roots and Milky Way. 16″ x 12″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

This is a commissioned piece, and my client requested that I create a new image with the sky similar to the sky in my painting, Lone Tree and Milky Way:

Lone Tree and Milky Way. 16″ x 16″, Oil on Wood, © Cedar Lee 2013

Lone Tree and Milky Way. 16″ x 16″, Oil on Wood, © Cedar Lee 2013

And a tree with roots similar to those in my painting, Gilded Breeze:

Gilded Breeze. 16″ x 12″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Gilded Breeze. 16″ x 12″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

This presented a fun challenge! For reference again, here’s what I ended up with:

Deep Roots and Milky Way. 16″ x 12″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Deep Roots and Milky Way. 16″ x 12″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

In this time lapse video from a day’s work in my studio, you can see me working on this painting (I tone some small wood panels first–skip to 0:23 if you are impatient):

Side-view:

Deep Roots and Milky Way. 16″ x 12″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Deep Roots and Milky Way. 16″ x 12″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Eclipse Birds

October 20th, 2016

This is “Eclipse Birds.”

Eclipse Birds. 30" x 24", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Eclipse Birds. 30″ x 24″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Small silhouetted birds perch in the branches of a tree during a total solar eclipse.

Cedar Lee with her art: Eclipse Birds. 30" x 24", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Cedar Lee with her art: Eclipse Birds. 30″ x 24″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

This is one of my favorite paintings in the studio right now!

Detail: Eclipse Birds. 30" x 24", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Detail: Eclipse Birds. 30″ x 24″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

This is called a “diamond ring corona” because the starburst of light makes the sun’s corona look like a shining diamond on a ring.

Detail: Eclipse Birds. 30" x 24", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Detail: Eclipse Birds. 30″ x 24″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

The awe-inspiring scene is painted in gold, rose and violet colors.

Eclipse Birds. 30" x 24", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Eclipse Birds. 30″ x 24″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

The painting continues around the 2.5″ deep edges of the painting.

Eclipse Birds. 30" x 24", Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Eclipse Birds. 30″ x 24″, Oil on Canvas, © 2016 Cedar Lee

Watch a time-lapse video of me painting it!

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